Blog Categories

About Us

AceMagnetics.com has become the premier magnetic bracelet, copper bracelet and magnetic jewelry online catalog as a result of our commitment to one simple tenet - customer service.
Continue

Recent Posts

Blog Archive

  1. August 20151 Posts
  2. March 20151 Posts
  3. June 20141 Posts
  4. December 20131 Posts
  5. November 20131 Posts
  6. August 20131 Posts
  7. March 20132 Posts
  8. December 20121 Posts
  9. November 20121 Posts
  10. August 20121 Posts
  11. December 20111 Posts
  12. November 20112 Posts
  13. October 20113 Posts
  14. September 20111 Posts
  15. August 20113 Posts
  16. June 20111 Posts
  17. April 20112 Posts
  18. March 20113 Posts
  19. February 20112 Posts
  20. January 20115 Posts
  21. December 20102 Posts
  22. November 20101 Posts
  23. October 20105 Posts
  24. August 20105 Posts
  25. June 20101 Posts
  26. May 20101 Posts
  27. April 20101 Posts
  28. March 20104 Posts
  29. February 20105 Posts
  30. January 20106 Posts
  31. December 20096 Posts
  32. October 20096 Posts
  33. September 20095 Posts
  34. August 20096 Posts
  35. July 200912 Posts
  36. June 20094 Posts
  37. May 20096 Posts
  38. April 20095 Posts
  39. March 200910 Posts
  40. February 20094 Posts
  41. January 20094 Posts
  42. December 20089 Posts
  43. November 20084 Posts
  44. October 20081 Posts
  45. September 20086 Posts
  46. August 20082 Posts
  47. July 20081 Posts
  48. April 20081 Posts
  49. February 20083 Posts
  50. January 20089 Posts
  51. December 20074 Posts
  52. September 20072 Posts
  53. August 20071 Posts
  54. July 20073 Posts
  55. June 20079 Posts
  56. May 200719 Posts
  57. April 200734 Posts
  58. March 200748 Posts
  59. February 200722 Posts
  60. January 20077 Posts
  61. December 20061 Posts
  62. November 200622 Posts
  63. October 200611 Posts
  64. September 20062 Posts
  65. August 20065 Posts

Nov 02

"Magnet" From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Magnet

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from Magnets)
Jump to: navigation, search
Iron filings in a magnetic field generated by a bar magnet
Enlarge
Iron filings in a magnetic field generated by a bar magnet

A magnet is an object that has a magnetic field. It can be in the form of a permanent magnet or an electromagnet. Permanent magnets do not rely upon outside influences to generate their field. They occur naturally in some rocks, but can also be manufactured. Electromagnets rely upon electric current to generate a magnetic field - when the current increases, so does the field.

Contents

[hide]
  • 1 Properties of magnets
  • 2 Physical origin of magnetism
  • 3 Characteristics of magnets
    • 3.1 Permanent magnets and dipoles
    • 3.2 North-south pole designation and the Earth's magnetic field
  • 4 Common uses for magnets and electromagnets
  • 5 Magnetization of materials
  • 6 Demagnetizing materials
  • 7 Types of permanent magnets
  • 8 Magnetic forces
    • 8.1 Magnets and ferromagnetic materials
    • 8.2 Magnets and diamagnetic materials
    • 8.3 Magnets and paramagnetic materials
    • 8.4 Calculating the magnetic force
      • 8.4.1 Force between two monopoles
      • 8.4.2 Force between two very close attracting surfaces
      • 8.4.3 Force between two bar magnets
  • 9 See also
  • 10 Online references
  • 11 Printed references
  • 12 External links

[edit] Properties of magnets

Magnets are attracted to, or repelled by, other materials. A material that is strongly attracted to a magnet is said to have a high permeability. Iron and steel are two examples of materials with very high permeability, and they are strongly attracted to magnets. Liquid oxygen is an example of something with a low permeability, and it is only weakly attracted to a magnetic field. Water has such a low permeability that it is actually slightly repelled by magnetic fields. Everything has a measurable permeability: people, gases, and even the vacuum of outer space.

The SI unit of magnetic field strength is the tesla, and the SI unit of total magnetic flux is the weber. 1 weber = 1 tesla flowing through 1 square meter, and is a very large amount of magnetic flux.

[edit] Physical origin of magnetism

 

Read On..... 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnets

Posted by Jay Roberts at 04:21 AM | Permalink

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://site.acemagnetics.com/blog-mt/mt-tb.fcgi/28